Drawing from Above and Below, 2009, glass and mirror, 4' x 16' x 1/4", in Boston University 808 Gallery as part of Traces and Places exhibition Drawing from Above and Below uses simple materials placed in a specific manner in the space to create a drawing which highlights existing characteristics of the gallery. A standard 4 x 8' piece of glass is placed abutting a 4 x 8' piece of mirror. The glass frames a portion of the geometric design on the floor and the mirror reflects the ornate designs on the ceiling. This work flattens aspects of the architectural space bringing them into relationship with each other.  This work was made in an unusual manner in that I never physically experienced the space myself and, working only with photographs and drawings from the curator, directed the making of the work from a distance. Artist colleagues acted as my proxy, a local glass man provided use of the materials temporarily and a photographer documented the work. I never experienced the work directly myself.  This piece is part of my ongoing questions around what comprises the work of art and who creates it. 

Drawing from Above and Below, 2009, glass and mirror, 4' x 16' x 1/4", in Boston University 808 Gallery as part of Traces and Places exhibition

Drawing from Above and Below uses simple materials placed in a specific manner in the space to create a drawing which highlights existing characteristics of the gallery. A standard 4 x 8' piece of glass is placed abutting a 4 x 8' piece of mirror. The glass frames a portion of the geometric design on the floor and the mirror reflects the ornate designs on the ceiling. This work flattens aspects of the architectural space bringing them into relationship with each other. 

This work was made in an unusual manner in that I never physically experienced the space myself and, working only with photographs and drawings from the curator, directed the making of the work from a distance. Artist colleagues acted as my proxy, a local glass man provided use of the materials temporarily and a photographer documented the work. I never experienced the work directly myself. 

This piece is part of my ongoing questions around what comprises the work of art and who creates it. 

The Floor in the Floor, 2007, selectively refinished wood floor, Bernard Toale Gallery, Boston, MA, part of Provisional exhibition of site-specific works The Floor in the Floor is another instance of creating a kind of drawing in the space using existing qualities of that space. This work was sited in the Bernard Toale Gallery which, at the time, was comprised of three distinct gallery spaces. The three galleries were used in different ways and connoted varying levels of significance of the artists shown in each gallery. Previous configurations of the space remained, revealed by the distinctly different patterns of floorboards. In this work, I further highlighted the earlier configuration by having only that area refinished to a smoother, matte gloss finish. In this work, I disregard the hierarchy of spaces within the gallery and allow my work to invade all three spaces. The work is both subtle (some people didn't even notice it) and emphatic as it is the one artwork in the gallery that is actually touching the beholder's body. 

The Floor in the Floor, 2007, selectively refinished wood floor, Bernard Toale Gallery, Boston, MA, part of Provisional exhibition of site-specific works

The Floor in the Floor is another instance of creating a kind of drawing in the space using existing qualities of that space. This work was sited in the Bernard Toale Gallery which, at the time, was comprised of three distinct gallery spaces. The three galleries were used in different ways and connoted varying levels of significance of the artists shown in each gallery. Previous configurations of the space remained, revealed by the distinctly different patterns of floorboards. In this work, I further highlighted the earlier configuration by having only that area refinished to a smoother, matte gloss finish.

In this work, I disregard the hierarchy of spaces within the gallery and allow my work to invade all three spaces. The work is both subtle (some people didn't even notice it) and emphatic as it is the one artwork in the gallery that is actually touching the beholder's body. 

Floormap: Basketball Court, 2007, one of 5 x 7" set of 6 postcards This work came out of a series entitled After Hours, wherein the gallery owner gave me access to the gallery when it was closed. Over two years, I developed a number of performance and installation works, some of which appeared in exhibitions and others which went on to become further developed works.  Floormap is just that, a map of the floor of the gallery I was offered in which to exhibit my work. In order to become familiar with the space, I devised various strategies to physically "learn" the space. One of those approaches was to draw the space by making its shape in landscape cloth. I then moved the floor to the walls, folded it up and took it out into the neighborhood, virtually bringing the gallery to the city.  This work literally lays the gallery on top of the world allowing an opportunity to look at the two places in relation to one another.  The final form of the work was a set of six 5 x 7" postcards which were placed in the local pharmacy for sale. 

Floormap: Basketball Court, 2007, one of 5 x 7" set of 6 postcards

This work came out of a series entitled After Hours, wherein the gallery owner gave me access to the gallery when it was closed. Over two years, I developed a number of performance and installation works, some of which appeared in exhibitions and others which went on to become further developed works. 

Floormap is just that, a map of the floor of the gallery I was offered in which to exhibit my work. In order to become familiar with the space, I devised various strategies to physically "learn" the space. One of those approaches was to draw the space by making its shape in landscape cloth. I then moved the floor to the walls, folded it up and took it out into the neighborhood, virtually bringing the gallery to the city. 

This work literally lays the gallery on top of the world allowing an opportunity to look at the two places in relation to one another. 

The final form of the work was a set of six 5 x 7" postcards which were placed in the local pharmacy for sale. 

Cardboard Actions, still, detail, 2006, set of three still images from three-channel video and installation, solo exhibition, Carroll and Sons, Boston, MA

Cardboard Actions is part installation and part performance. I worked with recycled cardboard through a series of simple, unrehearsed tasks or “actions.” Each action resulted in a temporary sculpture which I observed before moving on to the next action. In this work, I am finding sculptural forms, not through direct, intentional design, but as the result of a simple activity and observation of its result.

Seep, 2004, birch plywood, latex paint, vinyl, in Seamless exhibition at Memphis College of Art, including Amy Sillman, James Siena, and Dan Devening. Seep is part of the series of poured paint works I created onsite between 2001-2004. This work takes the minimalist forms of the birch plywood and animates them with trails of red paint. The paint is thickly poured latex which sits as a dimensional object on the floor. 

Seep, 2004, birch plywood, latex paint, vinyl, in Seamless exhibition at Memphis College of Art, including Amy Sillman, James Siena, and Dan Devening.

Seep is part of the series of poured paint works I created onsite between 2001-2004. This work takes the minimalist forms of the birch plywood and animates them with trails of red paint. The paint is thickly poured latex which sits as a dimensional object on the floor. 

Poured Paint, 2003, 30 gallons of latex "mistake" paint poured in individual puddles and arranged randomly in the gallery, dimensions variable, Brickbottom Gallery, Somerville, MA Poured Paint represents a shift in my work toward task-like approaches to making. This work was inspired by a house painter's description of how he is required to detoxify leftover paint by pouring it out onto large sheets of cardboard to dry and then be disposed. I appropriated his task and instead poured the paint on plastic sheets, lifted up the resulting paint puddles and placed them in the gallery. The resulting work was described as "unapologetic" and "transparent" by beholders which are two qualities I seek in my work. 


Poured Paint, 2003, 30 gallons of latex "mistake" paint poured in individual puddles and arranged randomly in the gallery, dimensions variable, Brickbottom Gallery, Somerville, MA

Poured Paint represents a shift in my work toward task-like approaches to making. This work was inspired by a house painter's description of how he is required to detoxify leftover paint by pouring it out onto large sheets of cardboard to dry and then be disposed. I appropriated his task and instead poured the paint on plastic sheets, lifted up the resulting paint puddles and placed them in the gallery. The resulting work was described as "unapologetic" and "transparent" by beholders which are two qualities I seek in my work.